The Historical Sketch and Philanthropic Efforts of Phi Delta Chi

Contributed by: Domonique Dobson, Worthy Master of Arms, Class of 2018 and Michael Okegubwu, Phi Delta Chi Brother, Class of 2019

Phi Chi, the first professional fraternity of pharmacy, was founded on November 2, 1883 at the University of Michigan College of Pharmacy. Eleven men founded the fraternity along with the group’s advisor, Dean of Pharmacy Albert B. Prescott. According to the National Office’s records, “Both students and faculty recognized that such an organization would bring students of pharmacy together for the discussion of scientific questions pertaining to pharmacy and its sister sciences”. The pharmacy organization has since grown into the name Phi Delta Chi and has created 98 chapters nationwide. The chapters work with the Executive Council and Regional Officers each year to plan national meetings. The two annual meetings include Grand Council and the Leader-Development Seminar. Grand Council meets every other year on the odd year to conduct business. The Leader-Development Seminar meets every other year on the even year to help brothers develop life-long leadership skills. Although the brothers show great pride for the fraternity by planning and participating in meetings and events, they spend even more time and energy supporting their philanthropy, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Plaque and thank-you note from St. Jude's Children Research Hospital thanking Phi Delta Chi for their support.

Plaque and thank-you note from St. Jude’s Children Research Hospital thanking Phi Delta Chi for their support.

The Brothers of Phi Delta Chi began raising funds for St. Jude in 1995. In August 2007, the Fraternity pledged to raise $200,000 over 4 years. However, Phi Delta Chi surpassed this goal within 2 years with a letter-writing campaign called The Prescription for Hope. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital named their outpatient pharmacy to thank Phi Delta Chi for the support. The Executive Council and Regional Officers accepted brothers’ interest at that year’s annual Grand Council meeting and pledged a new goal of $1 million over 10 years. Phi Delta Chi successfully reached their goal this fall! St. Jude agreed to name an adjoining patient/parent room in honor of the Fraternity’s new donation. Adjoining parent rooms allow parents and patients to have privacy and comfort while staying at the hospital.

The University of Charleston School of Pharmacy’s Phi Delta Chi chapter, Gamma Chi, hosted a Yankee Candle fundraiser for St. Jude in October. The Worthy Keeper of Finance (treasurer) Jasiris Bocchecaimp (Class of 2019) worked diligently to organize and advertise the sale. The Gamma Chi chapter was able to raise $544.20 to further support our philanthropy. This total was only 40 percent of the total revenue from Yankee Candle purchases during the fundraiser.

Phi Delta Chi’s continued efforts to help local communities, like Charleston, as well as the nation, aids in spreading the word about pharmacy initiatives like Script Your Future, American Pharmacists’ Month, and general advocacy for the profession. Brothers create awareness of pharmacy by continually expanding our efforts to help individuals and families in need through St Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Phi Delta Chi members and advisors outside of UCSOP

Phi Delta Chi members and advisors outside of UCSOP

The newest members of the Phi Delta Chi Organization

The newest members of the Phi Delta Chi Organization

Reference: http://www.phideltachi.org/?page=HistoryofPDC

Script Your Future Goes Red at Macy’s

Script Your FutureOn February 3rd, UCSOP students and faculty members held a community outreach event by the local Macy’s store in the Charleston Town Center Mall. This event served as an opportunity for our students and faculty to educate the public about medication adherence and cardiovascular health while promoting Script Your Future and the Go Red For Women Campaign.

SNPhA and ACCP spear-headed this event along with numerous other student volunteers to reach out to the Charleston community. Posters about cardiovascular health, risk factors for heart disease, knowing the signs of a stroke, and smoking cessation were all made available to the public. Our students were available to provide education, resources, and answer questions about these materials as well. Students also provided free blood pressure screenings and raffles to those who stopped by the booths! Overall, this event was a huge success and a fun way for our students to engage our local community in taking the right steps to heart-healthy living.

UCSOP students and faculty at the Charleston Town Center Mall Macy's hosting a Script Your Future event

UCSOP students and faculty at the Charleston Town Center Mall Macy’s hosting a Script Your Future event

Dr. Kristy Lucas, Ms. Jane Condee, and Ms. Barbara Smith

 

 

CPFI & ACCP Join Together for Trunk-or-Treat Event

Christian Pharmacist Fellowship International (CPFI) and American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) participated in the Trunk-or-Treat event at the Kroger in South Charleston on October 29th for American Pharmacist Month. The overarching theme of this event was the promotion of The Teal Pumpkin Project. The Teal Pumpkin Project was launched as a national campaign by Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) in 2014.

FARE's Teal Pumpkin Project

FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project

FARE’s mission is to “improve the quality of life and health of individuals with food allergies, and to provide them hope through the promise of new treatments.” The idea of this project is to allow every child (with or without food allergies) to experience the tradition of trick-or-treating on Halloween, but in a safe way. At these events only non-food treats are offered such as glow sticks or small toys. In 2015, households from all 50 states and 14 countries participated. To take part in your home next Halloween—just place a teal pumpkin at your doorstep and FARE provides free printable signs to explain the meaning.

At this event, CPFI’s trunk theme was football, while ACCP decided to be superheroes. We provided the children glow sticks, fake insects, plastic jewels, and “Mr. Yuk” stickers. The “Mr. Yuk” stickers allowed us to explain to parents that it’s important to keep dangerous household (cleaning supplies, medications, insect repellants, etc) items away from their children. An easy way to do this is by placing a “Mr. Yuk” sticker on those items to alert the child that it is unsafe. As kids came to our trunk, we played beanbag toss, bowling, and other fun games. A member of CPFI also made a poster for American Pharmacist Month and this helped us to explain why UC students were participating in this trunk-or-treat.

CPFI & ACCP Students at the Trunk-or-Treat event.

CPFI & ACCP Students at the Trunk-or-Treat event.

The poster opened up conversation about the importance of recognizing food allergies and how pharmacists can play a role in their allergy management. Those with food allergies are not only affected by what they can or cannot eat, but they must also be cautious about what medications they take as well. Although many people are unaware, some medications are made from food-sources. Examples of some medications made with foods include: inhalers made with peanuts and flu shots made with eggs. It is important to mention all allergies to doctors and/or pharmacists to avoid any dangerous reactions.

Over 200 kids came to the event and we were able to talk to many of their parents about household and medication safety. With this being such a success, we hope to continue participating and make this an annual CPFI tradition.

For more information about FARE’s project, you can visit foodallegy.org/teal-pumpkin-project.

Contributed by Sydney Sowell, CPFI Secretary, Class of 2019

AAPS & NCPA Host Health Fair for American Pharmacists Month

On October 29th, 2016 the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) along with the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) chapters at UCSOP hosted a diabetes health fair at Fruth Pharmacy on Oakwood Road. This diabetes health fair was one of many events put together by the various organizations at UCSOP in honor of American Pharmacists’ Month.

While AAPS’s vision focuses on the development of products and therapies through research, a major part of their mission is to bring together all individuals involved in the pharmaceutical sciences in order to best serve patients. We saw this health fair as an opportunity to do just that. We were able to collaborate with students from other organizations that focus specifically on community pharmacy, but with whom we still share the ultimate goal of patient service.

“Through this health fair, we were able to embrace and exemplify the idea that while there are many facets and specialties within the field of pharmacy, we are all dedicated to the education and treatment of patients.”

At this event, AAPS and NCPA provided free blood glucose and blood pressure screenings to individuals in the Fruth Pharmacy store. Approximately 15 UCSOP students volunteered for this event between the two organizations. This event served as a great opportunity for P2 students to practice their newly-learned blood glucose and blood pressure monitoring skills on actual patients. P3s were able to use this an opportunity to interpret scores, as learned in our pharmacotherapy II class, and explain to patients their results.

AAPS & NCPA Students at Fruth at Oakwood Road's store hosting their health fair!

AAPS & NCPA Students at Fruth Pharmacy at Oakwood hosting their health fair!

During this health fair, we were able to serve approximately 30 patients. Many of these patients were highly engaged in their own health; they knew what medications they were taking and knew what their normal values were. These patients appreciated the opportunity to quickly test their blood pressure and blood glucose to make sure they were reaching their goals. However, we also interacted with patients who had very little knowledge of blood glucose and blood pressure screenings. With these patients, we had the chance to educate them on why each test was important and explain consequences of high readings. There were also patients who understood the screening methods and knew they were diagnosed with diabetes, but did not seem to take their diagnoses seriously. These patients mentioned having family histories of diabetes and seemed to think that it was inevitable that they too develop diabetes. For these patients, we stressed the importance of taking medications as prescribed and regularly checking their blood glucose and blood pressure.

This health fair served as an opportunity to reach out to the Charleston community. Through this event, we were able to educate members of our community, bring attention to our school of pharmacy, and promote the profession of pharmacy. AAPS and NCPA, two organizations that may not seem to be associated, were able work together and support one another.

Contributed by: Suyasha Pradhan, AAPS Vice-President, Class of 2018

Tips & Tricks for Applying for Residencies

Contributed By: Katie Oliver, Class of 2017, Phi Lambda Sigma Secretary

As a fourth-year student approaching the end of my time in pharmacy school, it finally feels like I can see the light at the end of the tunnel! All of my time with didactic classwork and clinical rotations is quickly coming to a close. With that being said, there is still one thing hanging over my head – applications for PGY1 residency.

PGY1 Pharmacy Practice Residencies are optional additional training after graduation with your Pharm.D degree. These programs provide recently graduated pharmacists with an opportunity to finely tune their clinical skills in real world practice. While you are able to practice independently as a pharmacist, you remain under the supervision of other pharmacists who are there to provide advice, constructive criticism, and clinical experience. It is estimated that completing one year of residency will provide you with clinical knowledge equivalent to 3 years of clinical practice.

If you feel that completing a PGY1 residency may be in your future, I wanted to provide some helpful tips and tricks, as well as some information I wish I would have known prior to applying:

  • Applications for PGY1 residencies exist almost exclusively on two online portals; PhORCAS and The Match
  • PhORCAS
    • Almost identical to PharmCAS. This is where you will upload your transcripts, letters of recommendation, letters of intent, CV, pharmacy schools attended, etc.
    • You will pay to submit your applications here, as well. PhORCAS costs $100. This price includes submitting applications to four programs. Every program you apply to beyond this costs an additional $40.
    • Fill out the online PhORCAS application fully. Do not rely solely on your CV to speak to your abilities and experience. Fill out every section of the PhORCAS application to the best of your ability.
  • Letters of Recommendation
    • Try to get references from individuals who have seen you practice clinically (e.g. preceptors) and who practice in similar settings to the type of programs you are applying to. (e.g. if you are applying to a program with an emphasis in infectious disease, try to get a letter of recommendation from a pharmacist who practices in this area).
    • Ask individuals if they would be willing to write you a letter of recommendation before you enter their information into PhORCAS. Once you enter their information it automatically generates and sends them an e-mail.
    • Letters of recommendation aren’t truly “letters” in PhORCAS. When PhORCAS sends the e-mail to the individual writing on your behalf, it is instead multiple short answers they answer in PhORCAS.
  • Letters of Intents
    • Individualize these to each program. Do not just speak about why you want to do a residency, but why you want to complete residency at their facility. Speak about what draws you to their program and why you feel you would benefit from it. Also, why would they benefit as taking you as a resident?
    • Make sure you format correctly! There are plenty of examples of PGY1 Letters of Intent on the internet.
  • Transcripts
    • Provide yourself plenty of time! PhORCAS will generate a document with you to print directly from their website that contains a barcode specific to you. You must then request your transcript from the university and have both of these documents mailed together. I would suggest starting this process several weeks prior to your applications being due.
    • Some programs require supplemental materials. Examples could include class rank, a photograph, undergraduate transcripts, etc. Pay attention to this!
  • The Match
    • This is where you submit your rank order list after you have completed your interviews. It is a separate website from PhORCAS. This is also where programs submit their rank order list of applicants.
    • The Match costs $150.
    • There are multiple phases of the match process. “Phase 1” and “Phase 2”. If you do not match with a program in Phase 1, you move on to Phase 2 for a second chance to match with programs who still have resident spots remaining. There is no additional cost for this.
    • If you do not match with a program in Phase 2, there is an opportunity to move on to the scramble process. This is provides a third opportunity to match with programs who still have residents spots remaining (it is completed in a much shorter time frame).

Applying for residencies is a stressful and difficult process, but definitely worth it in the end. If you are a current UCSOP student and have any questions about the application process, the faculty and staff at UC are more than willing to help!

White Coats on the Bridge

Every October is American Pharmacist Month and as such, the whole month is filled with activities at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy. Each pharmacy organization and class sponsors at least one American Pharmacist Month event to help spread the word and educate people regarding the different aspects of pharmacy.  From medication therapy management to administering vaccinations, it is pharmacist’s job to let people know that pharmacists can do so much more than just count pills!

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UCSOP students on the Southside Bridge, Charleston WV

This year, the class of 2018 in coordination with the American Pharmacists Association Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) student chapter and UCSOP Class of 2020, hosted an event called “White Coats on the Bridge”. On Tuesday, October 11th, student pharmacists from every current class at UCSOP and UC’s mascot, Mo Harv the Golden Eagle, gathered in their white coats on the side of the Southside Bridge between MacCorkle Avenue and Virginia Street in Charleston to help spread awareness and celebrate American Pharmacists Month. As people drove by on their way home from work that evening, students waved signs promoting UCSOP, encouraging people to talk to their pharmacist about their medications, and just supporting the profession of pharmacy overall.

The event took place during the beginning of flu-season, so students took advantage of the opportunity to encourage people to get their annual influenza vaccination. Using signs like “Don’t get spooked by the flu” and “Honk if You Got Your Flu Shot”, students were able to interact with the passers-by and educate them in a fast and effective way. My favorite sign of the evening however, simply said, “Honk if you love your pharmacist” and over the course of the two hours we were there, well over 300 cars let out a friendly honk as they drove by!

At UCSOP, we are constantly looking for new and different ways to educate patients on all of the different things that their pharmacist can do for them, and “White Coats on the Bridge” is something that we had never done before. Overall, it was a beautiful evening for the event, and we all had a ton of fun getting the word out about American Pharmacists Month in a new and exciting way. The best part though, was definitely the support we received from the public. As cars drove by, drivers and their passengers would honk and wave, and you could see the smiles on their faces. If nothing else, it felt good just knowing that a group of student pharmacists made an impact and brightened someone’s day. The hope is that this becomes an annual event that grows throughout the years at UCSOP.

Contributed by Ryan Nolan, Class of 2018 President

UCSOP Students Volunteer at Kanawha Charleston Health Department Harm Reduction Program

Contributed by: Grandee Dang, Class of 2019 ASCP Secretary 

Growing up within the inner-city communities of California, I was exposed to many of the social and economic problems that plagued the area. Drug addiction was one of the main reoccurring themes within the topic of discussions. Whether it was the “Just Say No” slogan broadcasted on our televisions or the “DARE” members congregating on the school grounds, the problem of drug abuse was always prevalent within my hometown of San Jose. The taboo nature of drug use bled into the community and unfortunately also dehumanized drug users. As a result, the terms “drug user” became associated with shaming and an overall sub community that have been labeled as “criminals” or hopeless addicts. However, as with any problem, there are two sides to the story. One of those is given to the general public and the vision that is often shared by those battling the drugs on the front lines.

During the week-long Thanksgiving break, my colleague, Alan Lam, and I were attracted to the idea of taking our time off to volunteer within the community. With the current opioid problem plaguing West Virginia, we became interested in learning more about educating ourselves about the opioid addiction and how we can better serve the community. Dr. Acree, an assistant professor and pharmacist at UCSOP,  had routinely volunteered at the Kanawha Health Department every Wednesday for the needle exchange. Intrigued, we both wanted to participate in the needle exchange along side with Dr. Acree.

“Just like the diverse community addiction affects, there is no singular solution to the problem, but the needle exchange program is a valuable asset in servicing these patients.”

The enriching experience illustrated that not all drug users are like the stereotypes that are often portrayed in the media. Many of the individuals who visited the clinic were not so different from those of the general population. They had jobs and families, but were stricken with the disease of addiction. During our visit we got to practice our empathy skills throughout our interactions with the patients at the clinic, as well. During the needle exchange, we realized that even though we cannot cure the disease of addiction or the influx of the opiate abuse, we can at least lower the spread of blood borne diseases associated with needle sharing. Just like the diverse community that addiction affects, there is no singular solution to the problem, but the needle exchange program is a valuable asset in servicing these patients. Upon observation, we realized that addiction could affect people of all ages from all socioeconomic backgrounds. In time we hope we could continue this program and perhaps expand it throughout areas where opiate abuse has uprooted the community. If these efforts save only one life or present the spread of blood borne disease to just one person, it is well worth the effort.

SCCP – American College of Clinical Pharmacy

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

The Student Chapter of Clinical Pharmacy (SCCP) is the student chapter of American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP). SCCP strives to “advance human health by extending the frontiers of clinical pharmacy through strategic initiatives, partnerships, collaborations, and alliances.” We accomplish this by, “promoting innovative science, helping in the development off successful models of practice, and advocating new knowledge to advance pharmacotherapy and patient care.”

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SCCP members participating at the Caregivers Health Fair at Temple Israel

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SCCP members Rani Saadallah, Jacob Jones, and Brandon Coleman helping kick off American Pharmacy Month at the University of Charleston Football Game

During the two semesters SCCP has been on campus we have participated in and developed many events and activities. In the spring semester SCCP hosts a faculty research symposium were faculty members are able to present their research to students as well as other faculty members. This has lead to students participating in research while still in school. We as an organization are also in the process of developing participation criteria for the annual ACCP research competition for first and second year pharmacy students. This would not only be a great opportunity to develop research and professional skills, but it would also give the student an advantage as they are applying to residencies during their P4 year. Another way SCCP helps its members to obtain residencies is by bringing in clinical pharmacists from around the community to talk about their individual jobs as well as what students need to do in order to obtain residencies in the future. These events give students a first person account of the countless job opportunities clinical pharmacists have and the path students need to take to get there. Throughout the year SCCP also participates in a variety health fairs to help advance the public knowledge on health care and enhancing patient care. This is an excellent opportunity for members to go out into the community and practice interacting with the public and other health care professionals.

As an organization we encourage the advancement of our members leadership, advocacy, and inter professional skills. This is accomplished through member participation in not only SCCP events, but as well as other organizational events on campus and throughout the area. Being a relatively new organization on campus there are many opportunities for new and current members to step up and have a leadership role in the organization and help lead the organization to advance the field of clinical pharmacy in the present and in the future.

For the 2015-2016 academic year the dues to join SCCP was $35 dollars for national dues and $5 for local dues.

Contributed by: Brandon Coleman, SCCP Treasurer (Class of 2019)

ASCP – American Society of Consultant Pharmacists

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

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ASCP members present at the Student Chapter Activity Poster Showcase at the ASCP annual meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) is a non-profit association that was established in the year 19691. As a student chapter of ASCP at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy (UCSOP) in Charleston, West Virginia, our mission correlates with the mission of the national chapter of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. The mission is the following:

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists empowers pharmacists and other healthcare professionals to enhance quality of care for all older persons through the appropriate use of medication and the promotion of healthy aging.1

The purpose of the student chapter at UCSOP is to allow ASCP members to enhance their skills as student pharmacists and promote the health care quality of the elderly in the Charleston area. The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists chapter at UCSOP is accomplishing this through various activities.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists invites speakers with geriatric experience, such as residents that have done or are doing their residency in geriatrics, to come to our meetings to talk to the ASCP members. A new educational series is scheduled to launch in the spring semester of 2016. The Health Educational Sessions will provide the elderly in nursing homes helpful information about their health and how they can better it. ASCP also tries to reach out to the community and show support. For example, the ASCP members have participated in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. The student chapter of American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) tries to make an impact in the school as well as in the community.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) is a growing chapter at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy. ASCP welcomes any student pharmacist that would like to make an impact in the lives of the elderly’s health care quality and wants to improve his/her leadership and communication skills. There is a $20.00 local feel to become an ASCP member. Currently, there is no national fee. As a member of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP), one is expected to attend the monthly meetings held at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy and participate in the events hosted by ASCP. The benefits of being an ASCP member include: online version of The Consultant Pharmacist journal, member discounts to ASCP’s online store and member discounts to ASCP meetings.1 ASCP is a great organization for those who would like to explore a different aspect of pharmacy, make an influence in the lives of others, and work together with fellow student pharmacists.

Contributed by: Glorisel Cruz (ASCP Parliamentarian, class of 2018) and Marina Farid (ASCP Historian, class of 2018)

Phi Delta Chi

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

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Brothers Jenny Long, Lindsay Tincher, and Felix Tran celebrate American Pharmacist’s Month at a UC football game.

Phi Delta Chi is a professional pharmacy fraternity that emphasizes community service, leader-development, and a strong sense of brotherhood for its members, boasting strong community service involvement and a large networking base around the country. It was founded in Ann Arbor, Michigan on November 2, 1883 and remains one of the largest professional pharmacy fraternities in the country as nearly 1 in every 12 pharmacists is a Phi Delta Chi Brother.

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Brothers Jenny Long, Byron Magedanz, and Domonique Dobson at Grand Council in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

This past August, the Gamma Chi chapter traveled to Albuquerque, New Mexico for the 70th Grand Council which over 600 collegiate and alumni brothers attended to participate in general business meetings, officer training courses, St. Jude’s bowling fundraisers, Continuing Education opportunities, and the chance to meet brothers from other chapters around the country. While there, the UCSOP chapter won two national awards, including the 100% Achievement Award and the Pharmacy Leadership & Education Institute (PLEI) Leaders in Action Scholarship.

During the Fall semester, the members of Phi Delta Chi focus on Fall Rush, which gives each student at UCSOP an opportunity to commune with members of the fraternity and see what our organization is about. Our Wednesday Night Tradition and Rush events included a Pizza Party Meet-and-Greet, Pumpkin Carving, Trivia at a local restaurant, and a Bonfire complete with hotdogs and s’mores. We had an excellent turnout for all of our events and were excited that students have shown a strong interest in our Fraternity.

Brothers Paige White (Beta Kappa, Campbell University), Jenny Long, Byron Magedanz, and Domonique Dobson with the Gamma Chi Charter at Grand Council in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

On various Wednesday nights, the fraternity enjoys going out to local restaurants and engaging in the fraternal fellowship that is so dear to Phi Delta Chi.

The members of Phi Dex are currently working on building an outdoor library for the Ronald McDonald House. Books will be placed in the library, and any resident of the Ronald McDonald House and the community is welcome to borrow books from the community library as well as donate to the library. Phi Delta Chi brothers are also planning on preparing a meal for the families staying at Ronald McDonald House during the spring semester.

Advisor Ron Ramirez proudly wears his letters in his lab at UCSOP.

Advisor Ron Ramirez proudly wears his letters in his lab at UCSOP.

Our plans for the coming Spring semester include partnering with Script Your Future by participating in the Script Your Future Health Fair at the Charleston Civic Center. In addition, we are planning on collaborating with the local CPFI chapter to

For more information about Phi Delta Chi, please visit phideltachi.org.

 

Contributed by: Jenny Long (Phi Delta Chi Worthy Chief Counselor, class of 2017) and Lindsay Tincher (Phi Delta Chi Worthy Inner Guard, class of 2017)