The Historical Sketch and Philanthropic Efforts of Phi Delta Chi

Contributed by: Domonique Dobson, Worthy Master of Arms, Class of 2018 and Michael Okegubwu, Phi Delta Chi Brother, Class of 2019

Phi Chi, the first professional fraternity of pharmacy, was founded on November 2, 1883 at the University of Michigan College of Pharmacy. Eleven men founded the fraternity along with the group’s advisor, Dean of Pharmacy Albert B. Prescott. According to the National Office’s records, “Both students and faculty recognized that such an organization would bring students of pharmacy together for the discussion of scientific questions pertaining to pharmacy and its sister sciences”. The pharmacy organization has since grown into the name Phi Delta Chi and has created 98 chapters nationwide. The chapters work with the Executive Council and Regional Officers each year to plan national meetings. The two annual meetings include Grand Council and the Leader-Development Seminar. Grand Council meets every other year on the odd year to conduct business. The Leader-Development Seminar meets every other year on the even year to help brothers develop life-long leadership skills. Although the brothers show great pride for the fraternity by planning and participating in meetings and events, they spend even more time and energy supporting their philanthropy, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Plaque and thank-you note from St. Jude's Children Research Hospital thanking Phi Delta Chi for their support.

Plaque and thank-you note from St. Jude’s Children Research Hospital thanking Phi Delta Chi for their support.

The Brothers of Phi Delta Chi began raising funds for St. Jude in 1995. In August 2007, the Fraternity pledged to raise $200,000 over 4 years. However, Phi Delta Chi surpassed this goal within 2 years with a letter-writing campaign called The Prescription for Hope. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital named their outpatient pharmacy to thank Phi Delta Chi for the support. The Executive Council and Regional Officers accepted brothers’ interest at that year’s annual Grand Council meeting and pledged a new goal of $1 million over 10 years. Phi Delta Chi successfully reached their goal this fall! St. Jude agreed to name an adjoining patient/parent room in honor of the Fraternity’s new donation. Adjoining parent rooms allow parents and patients to have privacy and comfort while staying at the hospital.

The University of Charleston School of Pharmacy’s Phi Delta Chi chapter, Gamma Chi, hosted a Yankee Candle fundraiser for St. Jude in October. The Worthy Keeper of Finance (treasurer) Jasiris Bocchecaimp (Class of 2019) worked diligently to organize and advertise the sale. The Gamma Chi chapter was able to raise $544.20 to further support our philanthropy. This total was only 40 percent of the total revenue from Yankee Candle purchases during the fundraiser.

Phi Delta Chi’s continued efforts to help local communities, like Charleston, as well as the nation, aids in spreading the word about pharmacy initiatives like Script Your Future, American Pharmacists’ Month, and general advocacy for the profession. Brothers create awareness of pharmacy by continually expanding our efforts to help individuals and families in need through St Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Phi Delta Chi members and advisors outside of UCSOP

Phi Delta Chi members and advisors outside of UCSOP

The newest members of the Phi Delta Chi Organization

The newest members of the Phi Delta Chi Organization

Reference: http://www.phideltachi.org/?page=HistoryofPDC

Pharmacogenetic Testing: Determining What Medications Are Right for You!

Have you ever been prescribed a medication that just did not work for you? Have you ever experienced a negative medication side effect that someone else on the same medication did not?

If yes, you may be able to thank your DNA.

Every human has his/her own, unique set of genetic code. This uniqueness or variation within our genes causes medications to be activated and metabolized differently, causing different effects on the human body. Some of these genetic variations can impact an individual’s response to their medications.

Pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing, usually done with a simple cheek swab, is used by healthcare professionals to determine which genetic variations are predominant within each patient. This information is then used to understand the patient’s response to certain medications. PGx alleviates the need for trial and error in the treatment of patients, and offers a way to strategically target therapies based on an individual’s genetic code.

Employing PGx testing gives healthcare providers the ability to screen medications before initiating therapy. This helps patients avoid drugs they will not even be able to process and/or metabolize well, and instead it provides their provider insight on what medications will work from the beginning. This can help accelerate the benefits from medications, reduce wasted time, reduce expenses for ineffective medications, and possibly even save lives.

References:

  1. Rxight. (2016). Why is PGx Testing Important? Retrieved January 10, 2017, from Rxight: Right Medicine, Right From The Start. http://rxight.com.

    Contributed by: Rebekah Dunham, Class of 2017

AAPS & NCPA Host Health Fair for American Pharmacists Month

On October 29th, 2016 the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) along with the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) chapters at UCSOP hosted a diabetes health fair at Fruth Pharmacy on Oakwood Road. This diabetes health fair was one of many events put together by the various organizations at UCSOP in honor of American Pharmacists’ Month.

While AAPS’s vision focuses on the development of products and therapies through research, a major part of their mission is to bring together all individuals involved in the pharmaceutical sciences in order to best serve patients. We saw this health fair as an opportunity to do just that. We were able to collaborate with students from other organizations that focus specifically on community pharmacy, but with whom we still share the ultimate goal of patient service.

“Through this health fair, we were able to embrace and exemplify the idea that while there are many facets and specialties within the field of pharmacy, we are all dedicated to the education and treatment of patients.”

At this event, AAPS and NCPA provided free blood glucose and blood pressure screenings to individuals in the Fruth Pharmacy store. Approximately 15 UCSOP students volunteered for this event between the two organizations. This event served as a great opportunity for P2 students to practice their newly-learned blood glucose and blood pressure monitoring skills on actual patients. P3s were able to use this an opportunity to interpret scores, as learned in our pharmacotherapy II class, and explain to patients their results.

AAPS & NCPA Students at Fruth at Oakwood Road's store hosting their health fair!

AAPS & NCPA Students at Fruth Pharmacy at Oakwood hosting their health fair!

During this health fair, we were able to serve approximately 30 patients. Many of these patients were highly engaged in their own health; they knew what medications they were taking and knew what their normal values were. These patients appreciated the opportunity to quickly test their blood pressure and blood glucose to make sure they were reaching their goals. However, we also interacted with patients who had very little knowledge of blood glucose and blood pressure screenings. With these patients, we had the chance to educate them on why each test was important and explain consequences of high readings. There were also patients who understood the screening methods and knew they were diagnosed with diabetes, but did not seem to take their diagnoses seriously. These patients mentioned having family histories of diabetes and seemed to think that it was inevitable that they too develop diabetes. For these patients, we stressed the importance of taking medications as prescribed and regularly checking their blood glucose and blood pressure.

This health fair served as an opportunity to reach out to the Charleston community. Through this event, we were able to educate members of our community, bring attention to our school of pharmacy, and promote the profession of pharmacy. AAPS and NCPA, two organizations that may not seem to be associated, were able work together and support one another.

Contributed by: Suyasha Pradhan, AAPS Vice-President, Class of 2018

Educating Charleston’s Youth About Safe Medication Practices

As first-year pharmacy students (P1s), we sign the Oath of a Pharmacist when we walk across the stage during the White Coat Ceremony. By signing this document, we are accepting the responsibility of utilizing our knowledge to serve the community. This year, the P1’s had the pleasure of using our knowledge to teach 5th grade students throughout the Charleston area about the dangers of misusing prescription medication by utilizing materials from Generation Rx.

In the past month, more than 6 million Americans ages 12 and older have taken a prescription medication for non-medical reasons. Drug overdose deaths, mainly from prescription medications, is the leading cause of accidental death in the U.S. Generation Rx’s goal is to educate our youth, college students, other adults in our communities, and seniors about enhancing medication safety in order to prevent them from being another statistic in the future of prescription drug misuse.

UCSOP Class of 2020 students celebrate safe medication use with 5th grade students!

UCSOP Class of 2020 students celebrate safe medication use with 5th grade students!

Being that West Virginia has one of the highest opioid abuse rates in the United States, it is vital to reach out to the children in our state and teach them the importance of using medications correctly while they are young. Our class was split up into twelve groups who would each present to one 5th grade classroom in two hour-long sessions. For the first session, we were given a PowerPoint to present that hit on all the core messages of Generation Rx such as not sharing medications, using medications as directed by a physician, proper medication storage, and being a good role model. In the second session, we were able to incorporate active learning activities for the students.

Overall this experience was truly rewarding. We wore our white coats to the presentations and you could tell the children wanted to hear what we had to say as a result. They were constantly participating and seemed to have fun while going through the PowerPoint. In order to see what information the children had retained, our group decided to play jeopardy with the class during our second session. I was impressed to see great improvements in their answers from our first presentation. It made me feel like we could actually be making a difference. If our presentation can prevent even one student from misusing medication in the future, then it can be considered worthwhile. Generation Rx is a very important organization and I think it is great that our school of pharmacy has become actively engaged with teaching it. I hope to continue partaking in events related to Generation Rx throughout my pharmacy school career.

Contributed by Glenn Schiotis, Vice President Class of 2020

Apply Early Decision at UCSOP

2016-17 PharmCAS Application Now Available: Apply Early Decision Today

Applying through the PharmCAS Early Decision program is a great way to get a jump-start on your pharmacy career. You will save time, money and stress by competing with a smaller applicant pool and having the opportunity to secure a seat before traditional applicants are considered. Be sure to request your UCSOP Early Decision Admissions Guide today.  The Early Decision deadline is September 6, 2016.

HAILEY

Applying early decision was one of the greatest choices I could have ever made. Coming into college I knew that I wanted to attend the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy, and early decision allowed me to get a head start on my application process. By applying early decision, I was able to find out my admissions decision faster, compete with a smaller pool of applicants, and even start building relationships with potential faculty and staff of the school. I strongly suggest applying early decision if you’re like me. The University of Charleston School of Pharmacy made my early decision process an amazing one! -Hailey Price, Class of 2019

Q: What are the benefits of applying Early Decision?

  • You are competing with a much smaller pool of applicants.
  • You will save the time, money, and stress of the long traditional application process.
  • By applying through the Early Decision Program, you can sit back and relax during your last year of undergraduate work while your fellow classmates are stressing over the application process!

Q:  Should I apply to other schools at the same time?

An Early Decision applicant may only apply to one pharmacy school during this time. If an applicant is not offered admission through the Early Decision program before the October deadline, they may begin applying to other schools at that time.

Q:  What is the Early Decision application deadline?

The Early Decision Application deadline is September 6, 2016.

Q:  What do I need to submit by the deadline?

By the September 6th deadline, PharmCAS must receive the following:

  • A complete PharmCAS application
  • All PharmCAS Fees
  • All transcripts from every college or university attended – including transcripts for dual credit taken in high school

If all requirements are not received by the September 6th deadline, PharmCAS will automatically change your status from an Early Decision Applicant to Regular Status. Your application will not be reviewed by the UCSOP until all requirements have been received.

Q: How long does it take to find out if I am accepted for Early Decision admission?

All Early Decision Applicants will be notified of their admissions decision by October 21, 2016.

Q: What happens if I am accepted?

If you are accepted through the Early Decision Program, you will be required to submit a non-refundable $1,000 Early Decision Tuition Deposit. This amount can be split into two $500 payments. The first payment will be due within one week of your notification of acceptance. The second $500 payment will be due by May 1, 2017.

Q: Can I change my mind after I am accepted for Early Decision?

A student who is accepted through the Early Decision Process is not eligible to apply to any other PharmCAS pharmacy school during that admissions cycle.

Q: Who do I contact if I have a question about my application or the Early Decision process?

 

Contact: Ms. Stacie Geise, Director of Pharmacy Recruitment & Admissions at staciegeise@ucwv.edu or 304-357-4889.

Almuna Spotlight! Life After Pharmacy School: Dr. Allison Richmond Williams

Contributed by: Jenny Long, Class of 2017

As a current fourth year pharmacy student at UCSOP, I often look forward to the day I graduate in 2017. I am excited for the day when I can put my pharmacy education into practice and utilize the information I have learned over these past few years while completing the pharmacy curriculum. I know I am not the only pharmacy student looking forward to the day we will finally be pharmacists, so I reached out to UCSOP alumnus Allison Williams (formerly Richmond) from the Class of 2015 for an Alumna Spotlight feature. Dr. Williams was generous enough to grant us an interview detailing her life after graduation to show us there is light at the end of the tunnel!

Joseph and Allison Williams at graduation in May 2015.

Joseph and Allison Williams at graduation in May 2015.

Q: Please tell us a little bit about yourself! Where are you from? Any hobbies or interests?

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Drs. Allison and Joseph Williams

Dr. Williams: My name is Allison Williams and I live in Charleston, WV with my husband and UCSOP alumnus Joseph Williams. I’m originally from Talcott, WV and moved to this area after graduation. I am employed by Wal-Mart Pharmacy and currently serve as a floating pharmacist working at multiple stores in the area. I am also serving as an alumni member of the UCSOP Fellows Advisory Board. I enjoy spending my days off with my husband when we get them together! I also enjoy reading, baking, singing, and hanging out with friends.

Q: Could you tell us a little bit about your duties as a pharmacist? What’s your daily life? Do you enjoy your job? How do you feel about taking on students as a preceptor?

Dr. Williams: As a floating pharmacist, I go to multiple stores during the week to help out during vacations and busy times. My day consists of verifying prescriptions, counseling and talking to patients, giving immunizations, talking to other healthcare professionals, and working with the technicians. I also have the opportunity to do MTM at some stores. I do enjoy my job, and it is very rewarding to help patients understand their medications. In the future when I am at one store all the time I would be willing to take students, but as of now it is too hard as a floating pharmacist.

Q: We recently heard you were married! How do you handle or maintain a balance between work and your personal life?

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Allison and Joseph Williams on their wedding day. Photo by Meredith Dickens.

Dr. Williams: Joseph and I got married in July 2015 in Charleston. At first it was hard to balance the time, but now it has become a lot easier. We don’t always have the same days off each week. Whenever we do share a day off together we try to enjoy each other’s company and do something fun. Since we are both pharmacists it is easy to get caught up in talking about work, but we have learned to takeq time to talk about the other things going on in our lives. Balancing work and personal life is challenging, but in the end its worthwhile to set aside time to enjoy our life together.

Q: Could you take us back to when you were a student at UCSOP? What was your favorite class? What was the most challenging class for you? Any suggestions for current students?

Dr. Williams: I had a strong interest in infectious disease so I really enjoyed the portion of Pharmacotherapy III taught by Dr. Robinson. I also really enjoyed Bad Bugs taught by Dr. Flaherty my P1 year. I would say that one of my most challenging classes was Immunology as a P1. For current students, it’s important to find the study method that works for you. Once you find that, stick with it and you will do just fine with the material!

Allison and Joseph Williams. Photo by Meredith Dickens.

Allison and Joseph Williams. Photo by Meredith Dickens.

Q: Do you have any other long-term goals or dreams?

Dr. Williams: I hope to be able to settle down into one store instead of floating between pharmacies. Joseph and I are also hoping to buy a house soon so that we may begin thinking about starting a family.

We would like to thank Dr. Allison Williams for her help with this post! We wish her the best of luck in her career as a pharmacist!

SCCP – American College of Clinical Pharmacy

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

The Student Chapter of Clinical Pharmacy (SCCP) is the student chapter of American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP). SCCP strives to “advance human health by extending the frontiers of clinical pharmacy through strategic initiatives, partnerships, collaborations, and alliances.” We accomplish this by, “promoting innovative science, helping in the development off successful models of practice, and advocating new knowledge to advance pharmacotherapy and patient care.”

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SCCP members participating at the Caregivers Health Fair at Temple Israel

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SCCP members Rani Saadallah, Jacob Jones, and Brandon Coleman helping kick off American Pharmacy Month at the University of Charleston Football Game

During the two semesters SCCP has been on campus we have participated in and developed many events and activities. In the spring semester SCCP hosts a faculty research symposium were faculty members are able to present their research to students as well as other faculty members. This has lead to students participating in research while still in school. We as an organization are also in the process of developing participation criteria for the annual ACCP research competition for first and second year pharmacy students. This would not only be a great opportunity to develop research and professional skills, but it would also give the student an advantage as they are applying to residencies during their P4 year. Another way SCCP helps its members to obtain residencies is by bringing in clinical pharmacists from around the community to talk about their individual jobs as well as what students need to do in order to obtain residencies in the future. These events give students a first person account of the countless job opportunities clinical pharmacists have and the path students need to take to get there. Throughout the year SCCP also participates in a variety health fairs to help advance the public knowledge on health care and enhancing patient care. This is an excellent opportunity for members to go out into the community and practice interacting with the public and other health care professionals.

As an organization we encourage the advancement of our members leadership, advocacy, and inter professional skills. This is accomplished through member participation in not only SCCP events, but as well as other organizational events on campus and throughout the area. Being a relatively new organization on campus there are many opportunities for new and current members to step up and have a leadership role in the organization and help lead the organization to advance the field of clinical pharmacy in the present and in the future.

For the 2015-2016 academic year the dues to join SCCP was $35 dollars for national dues and $5 for local dues.

Contributed by: Brandon Coleman, SCCP Treasurer (Class of 2019)

ASCP – American Society of Consultant Pharmacists

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

ASCP

ASCP members present at the Student Chapter Activity Poster Showcase at the ASCP annual meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) is a non-profit association that was established in the year 19691. As a student chapter of ASCP at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy (UCSOP) in Charleston, West Virginia, our mission correlates with the mission of the national chapter of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. The mission is the following:

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists empowers pharmacists and other healthcare professionals to enhance quality of care for all older persons through the appropriate use of medication and the promotion of healthy aging.1

The purpose of the student chapter at UCSOP is to allow ASCP members to enhance their skills as student pharmacists and promote the health care quality of the elderly in the Charleston area. The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists chapter at UCSOP is accomplishing this through various activities.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists invites speakers with geriatric experience, such as residents that have done or are doing their residency in geriatrics, to come to our meetings to talk to the ASCP members. A new educational series is scheduled to launch in the spring semester of 2016. The Health Educational Sessions will provide the elderly in nursing homes helpful information about their health and how they can better it. ASCP also tries to reach out to the community and show support. For example, the ASCP members have participated in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. The student chapter of American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) tries to make an impact in the school as well as in the community.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) is a growing chapter at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy. ASCP welcomes any student pharmacist that would like to make an impact in the lives of the elderly’s health care quality and wants to improve his/her leadership and communication skills. There is a $20.00 local feel to become an ASCP member. Currently, there is no national fee. As a member of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP), one is expected to attend the monthly meetings held at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy and participate in the events hosted by ASCP. The benefits of being an ASCP member include: online version of The Consultant Pharmacist journal, member discounts to ASCP’s online store and member discounts to ASCP meetings.1 ASCP is a great organization for those who would like to explore a different aspect of pharmacy, make an influence in the lives of others, and work together with fellow student pharmacists.

Contributed by: Glorisel Cruz (ASCP Parliamentarian, class of 2018) and Marina Farid (ASCP Historian, class of 2018)

Phi Delta Chi

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

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Brothers Jenny Long, Lindsay Tincher, and Felix Tran celebrate American Pharmacist’s Month at a UC football game.

Phi Delta Chi is a professional pharmacy fraternity that emphasizes community service, leader-development, and a strong sense of brotherhood for its members, boasting strong community service involvement and a large networking base around the country. It was founded in Ann Arbor, Michigan on November 2, 1883 and remains one of the largest professional pharmacy fraternities in the country as nearly 1 in every 12 pharmacists is a Phi Delta Chi Brother.

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Brothers Jenny Long, Byron Magedanz, and Domonique Dobson at Grand Council in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

This past August, the Gamma Chi chapter traveled to Albuquerque, New Mexico for the 70th Grand Council which over 600 collegiate and alumni brothers attended to participate in general business meetings, officer training courses, St. Jude’s bowling fundraisers, Continuing Education opportunities, and the chance to meet brothers from other chapters around the country. While there, the UCSOP chapter won two national awards, including the 100% Achievement Award and the Pharmacy Leadership & Education Institute (PLEI) Leaders in Action Scholarship.

During the Fall semester, the members of Phi Delta Chi focus on Fall Rush, which gives each student at UCSOP an opportunity to commune with members of the fraternity and see what our organization is about. Our Wednesday Night Tradition and Rush events included a Pizza Party Meet-and-Greet, Pumpkin Carving, Trivia at a local restaurant, and a Bonfire complete with hotdogs and s’mores. We had an excellent turnout for all of our events and were excited that students have shown a strong interest in our Fraternity.

Brothers Paige White (Beta Kappa, Campbell University), Jenny Long, Byron Magedanz, and Domonique Dobson with the Gamma Chi Charter at Grand Council in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

On various Wednesday nights, the fraternity enjoys going out to local restaurants and engaging in the fraternal fellowship that is so dear to Phi Delta Chi.

The members of Phi Dex are currently working on building an outdoor library for the Ronald McDonald House. Books will be placed in the library, and any resident of the Ronald McDonald House and the community is welcome to borrow books from the community library as well as donate to the library. Phi Delta Chi brothers are also planning on preparing a meal for the families staying at Ronald McDonald House during the spring semester.

Advisor Ron Ramirez proudly wears his letters in his lab at UCSOP.

Advisor Ron Ramirez proudly wears his letters in his lab at UCSOP.

Our plans for the coming Spring semester include partnering with Script Your Future by participating in the Script Your Future Health Fair at the Charleston Civic Center. In addition, we are planning on collaborating with the local CPFI chapter to

For more information about Phi Delta Chi, please visit phideltachi.org.

 

Contributed by: Jenny Long (Phi Delta Chi Worthy Chief Counselor, class of 2017) and Lindsay Tincher (Phi Delta Chi Worthy Inner Guard, class of 2017)

AAPS – American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

This year, the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) wanted to make a very large  impact in the UC School of Pharmacy. We have been pretty silent in the past, but this year we want to turn it all around and show that AAPS is able to make a beneficial contribution to the field of pharmacy.

AAPS members visit a Raffle Table at an AAPS meeting

AAPS members visit a Raffle Table at an AAPS meeting

We started off the year with our Cystic Fibrosis Event. We wanted to do an event for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) awareness as a part of American Pharmacists Month because pharmacists play a major role in orphan disease states such as Cystic Fibrosis. Orphan diseases don’t have many drug therapy options, so it is crucial for pharmacists to engage with the patient to ensure proper symptom management to increase quality of life.

In order to increase awareness of the roles that pharmacists play for patients who have Cystic Fibrosis, we had three speakers for our event. We had a P1 student from Marshall University School of Pharmacy speak about her son who has CF, a resident of Tennessee who has a daughter with CF did a Skype call, and Dr. Linger spoke about her research involvement with CF as well as her cousin who passed away due to complications from CF. Each speaker has been personally affected by Cystic Fibrosis through either her child or a relative. They spoke about their personal stories as well as how pharmacists have played an important role. One speaker mentioned the amount of care that her pharmacist gave her daughter and how important it is for pharmacists to treat their patients as human beings and give that personal care aspect.

Dr. Rebecca Linger speaking at an AAPS meeting

Dr. Rebecca Linger speaking at an AAPS meeting

We also had information pamphlets to hand out that discussed what Cystic Fibrosis is, the pathophysiology and epidemiology, and the treatment options that are available. We closed out our event with a raffle where attendees were able to purchase raffle tickets for a dollar each. Several sponsors around the Charleston area including Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse, Subway, Edible Arrangements, Books-A-Million, Café Creperi and several others donated the prizes. Through all of the raffle ticket purchases from our 60 attendees, we were able to raise $900 to donate to the West Virginia chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. We were told that this money would go towards the Great Strides Walk held in Charleston, WV in May to raise money for Cystic Fibrosis.

AAPS members listen to a speaker at a chapter meeting.

AAPS members listen to a speaker at a chapter meeting.

Overall, we felt this event was a great success and we hope to continue this event in the future and make it an annual one. Due to the success of this event, we want to continue putting on events for spring semester that can impact the UC community as well as the Charleston community. We will be putting on a health fair with NCPA as part of Script Your Future to educate patients on the importance of getting regular health checks and how this can greatly benefit them from reducing the risk future disease states such as hypertension and diabetes through regular blood pressure and blood glucose checks.

Contributed by: Monica Ven (AAPS President, class of 2017).