Need an Application Extension? Currently Waitlisted? Read below!

Some of you may be thinking to yourselves, “The admission cycle is coming to an end and I didn’t finish my application… There goes my dream of applying to the University of Charleston’s pharmacy program!”

Fear not, my friend. The University of Charleston School of Pharmacy has decided to extend its application period! Planning is essential, as there are a few hurdles applicants must clear before applying. Although the deadline has been set to June 1st, the applicant must have a profile with PharmCAS by May 18th. When the student is ready to submit their application, they can contact Ms. Stacie Geise, whose contact information will be included below, to request a 48 hour extension.  Once this request is processed, PharmCAS will contact the student via email confirming they have 48 hours to submit their application to the UCSOP.

 

“But, what if I was put on the wait-list? What happens now?” Well, luckily Ms. Geise has completed a thorough guide for wait-listed students!

GeiseThe applicants who are offered a spot on the waitlist are those we would love to have in our program at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy. Should a seat become available in the class, candidates from this list will be offered full admission into the UCSOP program.

What are my chances of being admitted from the waitlist? The number of students admitted from the waitlist varies from cycle to cycle. The University of Charleston School of Pharmacy will continue to make to make offers, as seats become available, until the start of the required PHAR 501L (Seminar in Professionalism) on August 10, 2015.

If I am made an offer, what will I need to do next?

  • Prior to May 1st: You will have one week to submit either your full $1,000 deposit or your first $500 installment (the second $500 installment will be due May 1st).
  • After May 1st: You will be required to submit your full $1,000 non-refundable tuition deposit by the given deadline.
  • Please note, as we get closer to August, the amount of time you have to accept your offer may decrease from one week, five day, three day, 24 hours.
  • The amount of time you have to accept your offer will be given to you at the time the offer is made (via phone and email).

Should I submit my FAFSA if I am on the waitlist?  We encourage students to submit their FAFSA while on the waitlist. This will help expedite the financial aid process if you are made an offer and the FAFSA has already been submitted.

University of Charleston School Code: 003818

What steps can I be taking now to prepare for an offer of admission to the UCSOP?  There are various admission requirements that admitted students need to complete prior to starting the program.

Some steps you can take now to prepare for an offer:

  • Start your Hepatitis B shot series (you must have the 1st and 2nd shot prior to starting the program)
  • Take your BLS-CPR Class
  • Start to get an idea of places to live in the Charleston area if you are wanting to live off-campus
  • Contact our office if you are interested in viewing all requirements in more detail
  • Continue working on completing any outstanding prerequisite courses (You will need to have successfully completed all prerequisite courses by July 24, 2015.)
  • If admitted, the first day of orientation (PHAR 501L) will be Monday, August 10, 2015

If I am offered admission, how will I be contacted?

  • The Office of Professional & Student Affairs (OPSA) will call and email you regarding your offer of admission.
  • Make sure the OPSA has your updated contact information at all times.
  • Be sure to check your voicemail and email daily in the event an offer is made.

keep-calm-and-believe-in-yourself-1588What if I am not offered admission by August 10, 2015? If you are not offered admission to the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy this cycle, we encourage you to apply again. We do participate in the PharmCAS Early Decision Program. You would need to complete and submit your PharmCAS by the September 1, 2015 deadline. Please visit http://www.pharmcas.org for details.

 

I am a student applying next year. Do you have any tips for avoiding the waitlist?

  • Apply early! The application typically is available beginning in July and interviews start in September for Early Decision applicants and November for traditional applicants.
  • Remember, it generally takes 4-6 weeks for an application to be verified by PharmCAS once a completed application and all transcripts are received.
  • Follow up with those writing your letters of recommendation as a missing letter could delay you in moving forward in the UCSOP admissions cycle.

Monitor the status of your PharmCAS application through the website, check emails often. Remember to check your Junk/Spam folder as sometimes important, time-sensitive emails from PharmCAS and the UCSOP can end up in this folder.

 

Ms. Stacie Geise
UC SOP Admissions Specialist
phone: 304-357-4889
email: staciegeise@ucwv.edu

Contributed by Stacie Geise, UC SOP Admissions Specialist, and Peter Relvas, UC SOP Pharmacy Student & Graduate Intern, Office of Professional and Student Affairs.

Life After Pharmacy School: It DOES Exist!

As a current student and tour guide to UCSOP applicants, I often joke that students look forward to two very specific days in their pharmacy school careers. The first being the day they get accepted into pharmacy school, and the second quickly becomes the day they graduate. As soon as the first year starts, students are already thinking about graduation. They wish for no more all-nighters, 3-hour lectures, or K-type or “Select All of the Above” exam questions. Instead, they dream of getting paid for saving lives and helping people receive their medications.

Now we have someone to give hope to all of those current and future pharmacy students! Today’s feature puts the spotlight on UCSOP alumnus Carly Preece (formerly Marcum) from the Class of 2014. Dr. Preece was generous enough to grant us an interview detailing her life after graduation and showing us that there is light at the end of the tunnel!

Q: Please tell us a little bit about yourself! Where are you from? Any hobbies or interests?

Dr. Preece: My name is Carly Preece (formerly Marcum). I am from Pike County in Kentucky. I recently married Chase Preece. I have an older brother, Justin Marcum (lawyer and House of Delegates member), 2 nieces, and 5 nephews. I enjoy working out, running, spending time with family, and cheering on my alma mater, the University of Kentucky Wildcats. Go Cats!

carly1

Q: Could you tell us a little bit about your duties as a pharmacist? What’s your daily day life? Do you enjoy your job? How do you feel about taking on students?

Dr. Preece: I work at Kmart Pharmacy (Patrick St and Kanawha City stores). My days are crazy and busy, but I enjoy my job and never take a day for granted. I do a little bit of everything in the pharmacy. My days involve opening the store, running out auto-fill prescriptions for the day, answering phone calls and counseling, giving immunizations, calling insurance companies, checking and filling prescriptions, completing the daily drug orders, and when time allows, checking the inventory for outdates. The most important and enjoyable part of my job though, is when I feel that I am making a difference in a patient’s life and/or when I am able to teach them something about their medications that they didn’t already know. I enjoy having students at the store and try to make everything a learning experience. I feel that on-hand experience is the best way of learning and nothing can take the place of that.

carly2

Q: We recently heard you were married! How do you handle or maintain a balance between work and your personal life?

Dr. Preece: My husband and I were married just after I graduated. We recently bought a house out of the Charleston area too, so I currently have a little drive to work. Time management is crucial, since I usually do 10 or 12 hour days. I don’t have much time to do anything else after work. However, my husband and I have definitely developed a routine and take turns making dinner, completing house chores, and running errands depending on our schedules. We try to balance time with our friends and family, as well as with each other, since these are very important to the both of us. Life after pharmacy school is great though. It took me 8 years to get there but all the hard work was definitely worth it. I feel extremely blessed and no matter how stressful my days can be sometimes, I never take my job for granted.

carly5

Q: Could you take us back to when you were a student in UCSOP? What was your favorite class? What was the most challenging class for you? Any suggestions for current students?

Dr. Preece: I enjoyed pharmacy school for the most part. There were ups and downs, of course. Some classes were easy for me, while others were harder. It was a lot of hard work, but I knew there was nothing else I wanted to do. My favorite class was therapy, though. I enjoy the clinical aspect of pharmacy and therapy brought everything together that I had been learning for the first 2.5 years in pharmacy school.

My greatest advice is to never fall behind. I stayed on top of every class, the best I could, so I didn’t have to cram. You learn better that way and the information stays with you for the long term. Every night, I would always read before therapy and was prepared for class so that when the teacher lectured, I was able to listen. It was just reinforcing everything I learned the night before.

You also have to prioritize your duties because sometimes you can get too much on your plate, which is another reason why it is crucial to stay on top of things and make the best of your time. When you are in class, make the best of it and pay attention. Yes, I know it is hard sometimes to pay attention for hours at a time, but I just pushed myself. I knew that when I went home, I would rather relax for a bit, go for a run, and spend time with my future husband/family/friends, instead re-reading everything. It is also equally important to make “fun time” as well and remember to enjoy this part of your life.

carly3

Q: Do you have any other long-term goals or dreams?

Dr. Preece: I feel very content right now. I feel like I have achieved my dreams. I am married, just bought a house, have a great job, amazing friends and family, and doing what I love to do. My long-term goals now are to work on starting a family with my husband, paying off my student loans, and striving on a daily basis to do great things for my patients. I take great pride in my job and always want to make a patient feel like they can come talk to me anytime about anything.

We would like to thank Dr. Carly Preece for her help with this post, as well as P3 Juhee Kim, who interns at K-Mart with Dr. Preece! Without them, this post would not be nearly as entertaining or informative!

 

Contributed by Peter Relvas UC SOP Pharmacy Student & Graduate Intern, Office of Professional and Student Affairs.

Students Visit Capitol Hill

When applying to a pharmacy school, students must consider the plethora of opportunities the school can offer them. “What can this school offer to me? Why UCSOP instead of another school?” One of the reasons the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy is often chosen is because of its focus on a small, tight-knit community as well as its efforts in advocacy. Students are encouraged to advocate for their profession, and help push health care forward,  locally and nationally.

Katie Oliver and Brian Hancock on Capitol Hill

Katie Oliver and Brian Hancock on Capitol Hill

Proactive students, like Katie Oliver (P2) and Brian Hancock (P2), make the most of these opportunities. When offered the chance to travel to Washington, D.C., the two jumped at the possibility to meet with congressmen and women. The goal was to educate Senators and Representatives on the benefits of granting pharmacists “provider status,” which would expand a pharmacist’s role and allow them to be paid for various new services. Katie’s reflection of the event gives upcoming students an idea of what a student-pharmacist can accomplish.

Katie: “I was recently given the opportunity to visit Capitol Hill in Washington D.C. where I met with several congressman in order to advocate for Pharmacist Provider Status. I was provided the opportunity through Student Society of Health-System Pharmacists, a national student pharmacist organization that is available for membership at the University of Charleston.

I am grateful to have had this experience because it taught me the importance of advocating on behalf of the profession of pharmacy. Throughout my visit I was able to have a personal meeting with four United States congressmen regarding provider status for pharmacists in medically under served areas, a topic that could drastically change health care as well as pharmacist-patient interactions.  The congressmen were very responsive and interested in our views, most importantly how Provider Status for pharmacists would impact the lives of our patients.

After our visit to Capitol Hill, numerous additional congressmen signed on as cosponsors to the corresponding Provider Status bill. The experience revealed to me that many congressmen unfortunately do not have a background in health care. This is why it is imperative that we advocate on behalf of our profession and patients. I would strongly encourage any student or potential student to become involved in advocacy events. Change can be seen based on a few citizens’ actions.”

Thank you to Katie Oliver for helping with this post! Keep up the good work!

Contributed by Peter Relvas UC SOP Pharmacy Student & Graduate Intern, Office of Professional and Student Affairs.