Pharmacist Day at the WV Legislature

The University of Charleston School of Pharmacy joined Marshall University School of Pharmacy (MUSOP) and West Virginia University School of Pharmacy (WVUSOP) to help promote the profession of pharmacy and impact public health for all West Virginia residents during the 2015 Pharmacists Day at the Legislature. The event was held at the State Capitol Complex on Monday, February 23, 2015. Under the guidance of Drs. Capehart (WVUSOP), Gardner (UCSOP), Lucas (UCSOP), and Wolcott (MUPDATL PhotoSOP), over 300 pharmacy students participated to help advocate for the profession and for our patients.

In total, 31 groups of students (5-6 per group) met with delegates and senators to share the pharmacists’ role in health care delivery. Many representatives were more than willing to take time out of their busy schedules to meet with students and talk about upcoming legislation and public health concerns. Information about medication adherence was also distributed to 389 persons as part of the University of Charleston’s Script Your Future Campaign.

P3 Kyle Sargent performing a blood pressure reading as Ms. Smith counsels a patient.

P3 Kyle Sargent performing a blood pressure reading as Ms. Smith counsels a patient.

In addition to advocating for the profession, Ms. Barbara Smith, an instructor and preceptor for UCSOP, organized a blood pressure and diabetes health fair at the Capitol to help educate individuals on the importance of monitoring their blood pressure and blood glucose levels, as well as providing them with a blood pressure reading while on site. In total, 60 patients had their blood pressures and diabetes risks screened, helping to demonstrate the importance and versatility of pharmacists in a healthcare system.

Contributed by Peter Relvas UC SOP Pharmacy Student & Graduate Intern, Office of Professional and Student Affairs.

Celebrating Women in Pharmacy–Gertrude Elion

In honor of Women’s History Month, we will be posting a few short snippets about women in pharmacy periodically throughout March 2015. We start with Gertrude B. Elion, an American pharmacologist and biochemist.

download (3)Elion is most famous for her scientific discovery of the drugs needed to treat leukemia and herpes. She also discovered the drugs necessary to prevent the rejection of kidney transplants. Her worked earned her Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1988 which she shared with George H. Hitchings, her long-time boss and collaborator at Burroughs-Wellcome, and also Sir James W. Black.

She is quoted as saying: “Don’t be afraid of hard work. Nothing worthwhile comes easily. Don’t let others discourage you or tell you that you can’t do it. In my day I was told women didn’t go into chemistry. I saw no reason why we couldn’t.” 

Contributed by: Dr. Susan M. Gardner, Assistant Professor & Assistant Dean for Professional and Student Affairs (Course Coordinator for PHAR 546: History of Pharmacy)