Pharmacy Students and Faculty Enjoy an Evening of Celebration

Contributed by: Jenny Long, Class of 2017

The spring semester at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy is always full of celebration, with some of the most anticipated events being the Rites of Passage Ceremony, Honors & Awards, and the Pharmacy Gala. This spring, the Rites of Passage Ceremony was held on April 15th in the Geary Auditorium at UC, while the Pharmacy Gala was held immediately after the ceremony in the Rotunda and Erma Byrd Art Gallery.

 

P3 Seol Park poses for a picture with retiring faculty member Dr. Dennis K. Flaherty

P3 Seol Park poses for a picture with retiring faculty member Dr. Dennis K. Flaherty

The Rites of Passage Ceremony recognizes P3 students by presenting them with a pin to wear on their white coats as they end their didactic curriculum and start P4 rotations. Many P3s, including Renee Neidich, were honored to receive this recognition as a result of the hard work and dedication needed to receive it. “This pin may not look like much, but it shows three years of hard work, dedication, long days with sleepless nights, breakdowns and tears, and smiles and good times.”

The pin received at the Rites of Passage Ceremony not only represents the hard work students have put into their pharmacy school careers, it also signifies a new chapter in their lives for the upcoming school year. Renee says, “It signifies the end of my didactic (in class), years of pharmacy school and opens the road for the last leg of my journey: P4 rotations and a year packed with experience and learning. This pin may not look like much, but it means the world to me.”

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Faculty members Drs. Sarah Embrey, Karrie Juengel, Michelle Knight, and Alice Gahbauer strike a pose in the photo booth at the Pharmacy Gala.

In addition to the Rites of Passage, several students received awards and scholarships during the Honors & Awards Ceremony. Katie Oliver, a recipient of the Leadership Award and the Rita Carrico Memorial Scholarship, says that being awarded two scholarships was a highlight of the night. “Accepting two scholarships at The Rites of Passage Ceremony was a wonderful way to end my P3 year! Being recognized for the hours of hard work put into this curriculum, and experiencing that with my family, is a wonderful experience that I am grateful for.” Katie also says that the scholarship money rewarded at the Honors & Awards Ceremony will be helpful in paying for the expenses of the upcoming year of rotations. “I am so thankful for the scholarships and opportunities provided to me, as they will help immensely during my P4 clinical rotations.”

After the ceremony, students attended the Pharmacy Gala to enjoy a night of celebration with their classmates and families. This is the first year the event was held immediately after the Honors and Awards and Rites of Passage Ceremony, but Pharmacy Gala chair Sydney Bailey feels that the Pharmacy Gala was a great success. “I thought we had a great turnout and I think it was a great idea to have it right after the Honors and Awards and Rites of Passage Ceremony!”

P1 students Rachel Peaytt and Kathryn Howerton sign a picture to be gifted to retiring faculty member Dr. Dennis K. Flaherty.

P1 students Rachel Peaytt and Kathryn Howerton sign a picture to be gifted to retiring faculty member Dr. Dennis K. Flaherty.

Activities taking place at the Pharmacy Gala included signing a picture to give to retiring faculty member Dr. Dennis K. Flaherty, a DJ, heavy hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, and a photo booth. According to Sydney, all of these activities were popular among students, “The rotunda turned out beautiful, and everyone seemed to love the decorations and photo booth!”

Planning the Pharmacy Gala was a great experience for Sydney, along with co-chair Linda Nguyen and committee members P1s Jasiris Boccheciamp, Nneoma Imo, Kelcey Duerson, and Sara Yagodich. “Planning the Pharmacy Gala this year was a lot of fun, and it was rewarding to see the event come together when the day finally arrived,” Sydney said. “I cannot wait to see what the future holds for upcoming Pharmacy Galas.”

Almuna Spotlight! Life After Pharmacy School: Dr. Allison Richmond Williams

Contributed by: Jenny Long, Class of 2017

As a current fourth year pharmacy student at UCSOP, I often look forward to the day I graduate in 2017. I am excited for the day when I can put my pharmacy education into practice and utilize the information I have learned over these past few years while completing the pharmacy curriculum. I know I am not the only pharmacy student looking forward to the day we will finally be pharmacists, so I reached out to UCSOP alumnus Allison Williams (formerly Richmond) from the Class of 2015 for an Alumna Spotlight feature. Dr. Williams was generous enough to grant us an interview detailing her life after graduation to show us there is light at the end of the tunnel!

Joseph and Allison Williams at graduation in May 2015.

Joseph and Allison Williams at graduation in May 2015.

Q: Please tell us a little bit about yourself! Where are you from? Any hobbies or interests?

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Drs. Allison and Joseph Williams

Dr. Williams: My name is Allison Williams and I live in Charleston, WV with my husband and UCSOP alumnus Joseph Williams. I’m originally from Talcott, WV and moved to this area after graduation. I am employed by Wal-Mart Pharmacy and currently serve as a floating pharmacist working at multiple stores in the area. I am also serving as an alumni member of the UCSOP Fellows Advisory Board. I enjoy spending my days off with my husband when we get them together! I also enjoy reading, baking, singing, and hanging out with friends.

Q: Could you tell us a little bit about your duties as a pharmacist? What’s your daily life? Do you enjoy your job? How do you feel about taking on students as a preceptor?

Dr. Williams: As a floating pharmacist, I go to multiple stores during the week to help out during vacations and busy times. My day consists of verifying prescriptions, counseling and talking to patients, giving immunizations, talking to other healthcare professionals, and working with the technicians. I also have the opportunity to do MTM at some stores. I do enjoy my job, and it is very rewarding to help patients understand their medications. In the future when I am at one store all the time I would be willing to take students, but as of now it is too hard as a floating pharmacist.

Q: We recently heard you were married! How do you handle or maintain a balance between work and your personal life?

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Allison and Joseph Williams on their wedding day. Photo by Meredith Dickens.

Dr. Williams: Joseph and I got married in July 2015 in Charleston. At first it was hard to balance the time, but now it has become a lot easier. We don’t always have the same days off each week. Whenever we do share a day off together we try to enjoy each other’s company and do something fun. Since we are both pharmacists it is easy to get caught up in talking about work, but we have learned to takeq time to talk about the other things going on in our lives. Balancing work and personal life is challenging, but in the end its worthwhile to set aside time to enjoy our life together.

Q: Could you take us back to when you were a student at UCSOP? What was your favorite class? What was the most challenging class for you? Any suggestions for current students?

Dr. Williams: I had a strong interest in infectious disease so I really enjoyed the portion of Pharmacotherapy III taught by Dr. Robinson. I also really enjoyed Bad Bugs taught by Dr. Flaherty my P1 year. I would say that one of my most challenging classes was Immunology as a P1. For current students, it’s important to find the study method that works for you. Once you find that, stick with it and you will do just fine with the material!

Allison and Joseph Williams. Photo by Meredith Dickens.

Allison and Joseph Williams. Photo by Meredith Dickens.

Q: Do you have any other long-term goals or dreams?

Dr. Williams: I hope to be able to settle down into one store instead of floating between pharmacies. Joseph and I are also hoping to buy a house soon so that we may begin thinking about starting a family.

We would like to thank Dr. Allison Williams for her help with this post! We wish her the best of luck in her career as a pharmacist!

The Rho Chi Society- The Academic Honor Society

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients.

rhochiThe Rho Chi Society has been established as the honor society for the field of pharmacy. It has its origins in the merging of two honor societies, both established in 1917, one at the University of Michigan (the Aristolochite Society) and the other within the American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties. Through the leadership of the Conference and the dedication of students at the University of Michigan, the two groups established the bylaws and governing documents of the Society and on May 19, 1922, the Aristolochite Society was renamed the Rho Chi Society. The Society added chapters at schools of Pharmacy that were members of the Conference and within five years, eight chapters were established across the United States. In 1947, the Society became a member of the Association of College Honor Societies.

The vision of The Rho Chi Society is to “seek to advance pharmacy through intellectual leadership.”1 Our mission as a professional organization is to encourage and recognize intellectual development in the pharmacy profession.  We plan to do this by stimulating curiosity in pharmacy academics and encourage students to explore information beyond the classroom.  We promote the highest ethical standards through interaction with other students, professors, professionals, and the public.  Our end goal is to contribute to the development of intellectual leaders. Our purpose as members of Rho Chi Society is to “adhere to and promote the highest ideals in pharmacy, both scientific and cultural.”1

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Dr. Rebecca Linger, the Delta Lambda chapter advisor.

Membership to the Rho Chi Society is by invitation only and is awarded to only few professional/graduate students in pharmacy or faculty members of schools of pharmacy.  These select few are those who distinguish themselves by academic and professional achievements and also desire the mission and vision of Rho Chi Society.  Membership is obtained by invitation only.  University of Charleston School of Pharmacy represents the Delta Lambda chapter in the Mid-Atlantic region III.  The chapter advisor is Dr. Rebecca Linger.  New members of the chapter are initiated annually in a formal ceremony.

Aims and functions of the society not only include reward for outstanding scholarly attainment, but membership also encourages and stimulates outstanding scholarship.  Welcoming into the society is the highest achievement that is only offered to a select few.

The Delta Lambda chapter of the Rho Chi Society at University of Charleston School of Pharmacy participates in tutoring of fellow classmates.  During Fall 2015, tutoring has been offered for Biochemistry, Immunology, Pharmaceutical Calculations, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacology, Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacy Law, and Pharmacotherapy.  Our chapter also has an annual presentation named “How to Succeed in Pharmacy School.”  This has become a traditional for four years.  This presentation offers study tips and encourages new students to push themselves to perform at the level of professionals within the classroom.

Membership into Rho Chi allows its members to develop their teaching skills by participating in the tutoring service.  Teaching and mentoring are invaluable skills that benefit future managers, residents, and staff pharmacists.  Members of Rho Chi are future professional and academic leaders beyond graduation.  Rho Chi also offers its Members honor cords during the graduation ceremony.

For further information on Rho Chi, please visit the national website: http://rhochi.org/about-rho-chi/.

 Resources/References

 The Rho Chi Society (2013). Retrieved from http://rhochi.org/about-rho-chi/

 Contributed by: Anojinie Karunathilake (Rho Chi member, class of 2017) and George Copenhaver (Rho Chi president, class of 2016).

SCCP – American College of Clinical Pharmacy

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

The Student Chapter of Clinical Pharmacy (SCCP) is the student chapter of American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP). SCCP strives to “advance human health by extending the frontiers of clinical pharmacy through strategic initiatives, partnerships, collaborations, and alliances.” We accomplish this by, “promoting innovative science, helping in the development off successful models of practice, and advocating new knowledge to advance pharmacotherapy and patient care.”

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SCCP members participating at the Caregivers Health Fair at Temple Israel

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SCCP members Rani Saadallah, Jacob Jones, and Brandon Coleman helping kick off American Pharmacy Month at the University of Charleston Football Game

During the two semesters SCCP has been on campus we have participated in and developed many events and activities. In the spring semester SCCP hosts a faculty research symposium were faculty members are able to present their research to students as well as other faculty members. This has lead to students participating in research while still in school. We as an organization are also in the process of developing participation criteria for the annual ACCP research competition for first and second year pharmacy students. This would not only be a great opportunity to develop research and professional skills, but it would also give the student an advantage as they are applying to residencies during their P4 year. Another way SCCP helps its members to obtain residencies is by bringing in clinical pharmacists from around the community to talk about their individual jobs as well as what students need to do in order to obtain residencies in the future. These events give students a first person account of the countless job opportunities clinical pharmacists have and the path students need to take to get there. Throughout the year SCCP also participates in a variety health fairs to help advance the public knowledge on health care and enhancing patient care. This is an excellent opportunity for members to go out into the community and practice interacting with the public and other health care professionals.

As an organization we encourage the advancement of our members leadership, advocacy, and inter professional skills. This is accomplished through member participation in not only SCCP events, but as well as other organizational events on campus and throughout the area. Being a relatively new organization on campus there are many opportunities for new and current members to step up and have a leadership role in the organization and help lead the organization to advance the field of clinical pharmacy in the present and in the future.

For the 2015-2016 academic year the dues to join SCCP was $35 dollars for national dues and $5 for local dues.

Contributed by: Brandon Coleman, SCCP Treasurer (Class of 2019)

ASCP – American Society of Consultant Pharmacists

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

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ASCP members present at the Student Chapter Activity Poster Showcase at the ASCP annual meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) is a non-profit association that was established in the year 19691. As a student chapter of ASCP at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy (UCSOP) in Charleston, West Virginia, our mission correlates with the mission of the national chapter of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. The mission is the following:

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists empowers pharmacists and other healthcare professionals to enhance quality of care for all older persons through the appropriate use of medication and the promotion of healthy aging.1

The purpose of the student chapter at UCSOP is to allow ASCP members to enhance their skills as student pharmacists and promote the health care quality of the elderly in the Charleston area. The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists chapter at UCSOP is accomplishing this through various activities.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists invites speakers with geriatric experience, such as residents that have done or are doing their residency in geriatrics, to come to our meetings to talk to the ASCP members. A new educational series is scheduled to launch in the spring semester of 2016. The Health Educational Sessions will provide the elderly in nursing homes helpful information about their health and how they can better it. ASCP also tries to reach out to the community and show support. For example, the ASCP members have participated in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. The student chapter of American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) tries to make an impact in the school as well as in the community.

The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) is a growing chapter at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy. ASCP welcomes any student pharmacist that would like to make an impact in the lives of the elderly’s health care quality and wants to improve his/her leadership and communication skills. There is a $20.00 local feel to become an ASCP member. Currently, there is no national fee. As a member of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP), one is expected to attend the monthly meetings held at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy and participate in the events hosted by ASCP. The benefits of being an ASCP member include: online version of The Consultant Pharmacist journal, member discounts to ASCP’s online store and member discounts to ASCP meetings.1 ASCP is a great organization for those who would like to explore a different aspect of pharmacy, make an influence in the lives of others, and work together with fellow student pharmacists.

Contributed by: Glorisel Cruz (ASCP Parliamentarian, class of 2018) and Marina Farid (ASCP Historian, class of 2018)

Phi Delta Chi

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

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Brothers Jenny Long, Lindsay Tincher, and Felix Tran celebrate American Pharmacist’s Month at a UC football game.

Phi Delta Chi is a professional pharmacy fraternity that emphasizes community service, leader-development, and a strong sense of brotherhood for its members, boasting strong community service involvement and a large networking base around the country. It was founded in Ann Arbor, Michigan on November 2, 1883 and remains one of the largest professional pharmacy fraternities in the country as nearly 1 in every 12 pharmacists is a Phi Delta Chi Brother.

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Brothers Jenny Long, Byron Magedanz, and Domonique Dobson at Grand Council in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

This past August, the Gamma Chi chapter traveled to Albuquerque, New Mexico for the 70th Grand Council which over 600 collegiate and alumni brothers attended to participate in general business meetings, officer training courses, St. Jude’s bowling fundraisers, Continuing Education opportunities, and the chance to meet brothers from other chapters around the country. While there, the UCSOP chapter won two national awards, including the 100% Achievement Award and the Pharmacy Leadership & Education Institute (PLEI) Leaders in Action Scholarship.

During the Fall semester, the members of Phi Delta Chi focus on Fall Rush, which gives each student at UCSOP an opportunity to commune with members of the fraternity and see what our organization is about. Our Wednesday Night Tradition and Rush events included a Pizza Party Meet-and-Greet, Pumpkin Carving, Trivia at a local restaurant, and a Bonfire complete with hotdogs and s’mores. We had an excellent turnout for all of our events and were excited that students have shown a strong interest in our Fraternity.

Brothers Paige White (Beta Kappa, Campbell University), Jenny Long, Byron Magedanz, and Domonique Dobson with the Gamma Chi Charter at Grand Council in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

On various Wednesday nights, the fraternity enjoys going out to local restaurants and engaging in the fraternal fellowship that is so dear to Phi Delta Chi.

The members of Phi Dex are currently working on building an outdoor library for the Ronald McDonald House. Books will be placed in the library, and any resident of the Ronald McDonald House and the community is welcome to borrow books from the community library as well as donate to the library. Phi Delta Chi brothers are also planning on preparing a meal for the families staying at Ronald McDonald House during the spring semester.

Advisor Ron Ramirez proudly wears his letters in his lab at UCSOP.

Advisor Ron Ramirez proudly wears his letters in his lab at UCSOP.

Our plans for the coming Spring semester include partnering with Script Your Future by participating in the Script Your Future Health Fair at the Charleston Civic Center. In addition, we are planning on collaborating with the local CPFI chapter to

For more information about Phi Delta Chi, please visit phideltachi.org.

 

Contributed by: Jenny Long (Phi Delta Chi Worthy Chief Counselor, class of 2017) and Lindsay Tincher (Phi Delta Chi Worthy Inner Guard, class of 2017)

AAPS – American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

This year, the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) wanted to make a very large  impact in the UC School of Pharmacy. We have been pretty silent in the past, but this year we want to turn it all around and show that AAPS is able to make a beneficial contribution to the field of pharmacy.

AAPS members visit a Raffle Table at an AAPS meeting

AAPS members visit a Raffle Table at an AAPS meeting

We started off the year with our Cystic Fibrosis Event. We wanted to do an event for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) awareness as a part of American Pharmacists Month because pharmacists play a major role in orphan disease states such as Cystic Fibrosis. Orphan diseases don’t have many drug therapy options, so it is crucial for pharmacists to engage with the patient to ensure proper symptom management to increase quality of life.

In order to increase awareness of the roles that pharmacists play for patients who have Cystic Fibrosis, we had three speakers for our event. We had a P1 student from Marshall University School of Pharmacy speak about her son who has CF, a resident of Tennessee who has a daughter with CF did a Skype call, and Dr. Linger spoke about her research involvement with CF as well as her cousin who passed away due to complications from CF. Each speaker has been personally affected by Cystic Fibrosis through either her child or a relative. They spoke about their personal stories as well as how pharmacists have played an important role. One speaker mentioned the amount of care that her pharmacist gave her daughter and how important it is for pharmacists to treat their patients as human beings and give that personal care aspect.

Dr. Rebecca Linger speaking at an AAPS meeting

Dr. Rebecca Linger speaking at an AAPS meeting

We also had information pamphlets to hand out that discussed what Cystic Fibrosis is, the pathophysiology and epidemiology, and the treatment options that are available. We closed out our event with a raffle where attendees were able to purchase raffle tickets for a dollar each. Several sponsors around the Charleston area including Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse, Subway, Edible Arrangements, Books-A-Million, Café Creperi and several others donated the prizes. Through all of the raffle ticket purchases from our 60 attendees, we were able to raise $900 to donate to the West Virginia chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. We were told that this money would go towards the Great Strides Walk held in Charleston, WV in May to raise money for Cystic Fibrosis.

AAPS members listen to a speaker at a chapter meeting.

AAPS members listen to a speaker at a chapter meeting.

Overall, we felt this event was a great success and we hope to continue this event in the future and make it an annual one. Due to the success of this event, we want to continue putting on events for spring semester that can impact the UC community as well as the Charleston community. We will be putting on a health fair with NCPA as part of Script Your Future to educate patients on the importance of getting regular health checks and how this can greatly benefit them from reducing the risk future disease states such as hypertension and diabetes through regular blood pressure and blood glucose checks.

Contributed by: Monica Ven (AAPS President, class of 2017).

APhA – American Pharmacists Association

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) national organization was founded in 1852. With 62,000 presently active members, it is now the largest association of pharmacists in the United States. Members of this organization include practicing pharmacists, student pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and pharmaceutical scientists. The University of Charleston School of Pharmacy is very fortunate to have a local chapter of this widespread national organization.

P3s LaTasha Marshall and Beverly Okoroji, P2 Rafi Saadallah, and P4 Melanie Richmond present a poster for APhA's Operation Heart.

P3s LaTasha Marshall and Beverly Okoroji, P2 Rafi Saadallah, and P4 Melanie Richmond present a poster for APhA’s Operation Heart.

Locally, our APhA-ASP chapter at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy has over 100 student pharmacist members. Coincidently, it is also the largest student organization within the school of pharmacy. Having a lot of active members allows the organization to cover many different areas within the pharmacy field. One of our busiest and most exciting campaigns takes place annually in the month of October. Nationally, October is recognized as American Pharmacists Month. During this time, we as an organization sell American Pharmacists Month apparel, advocate publicly for the profession, and show our appreciation for the pharmacists and faculty that educate and prepare us for our future career.

Our APhA-ASP organization hosts an annual patient counseling competition. During this event, student pharmacists counsel a mock patient on a specific medication, and then UCSOP faculty judge each patient interaction and determine a winner. This exciting opportunity allows pharmacy students to have an authentic, valuable experience with professional feedback in a non-threatening environment. The winner also receives a paid trip to attend the APhA annual meeting in the spring, which is in Baltimore, MD this year. This is just one of many “perks” available to APhA-ASP members at the University of Charleston.

Within our chapter, we have many sub-committees that target different areas within the large umbrella of pharmacy. Operation Self Care, for example, educates students, pharmacists, and the general public on the significance of using over the counter medications safely and effectively. Similarly, GenerationRx provides information on prescription drug abuse, and the importance of taking the proper medication as prescribed. Other committees include Operation Immunization, Operation Diabetes, and Operation Heart

As with many major disease states, pharmacists can play an imperative role in preventing and managing cardiovascular disease. In 2009, Archives of Internal Medicine published a study demonstrating that collaboration between pharmacists and physicians resulted in better hypertension (high blood pressure) control. In 2014, 84 of the student chapters of APhA-ASP incorporated Operation Heart committees into their chapters, and we are hopeful that participation will continue to grow. Being the public’s most accessible health care provider, we as students and pharmacists should make an effort to educate our patients and advocate for our profession.

Contributed by: Celine Quevillon (APhA Secretary, class of 2017) and Lindsay Tincher (APhA Self-Care Co-Chair, class of 2017)

Pharmacy Organizations: Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International

During the month of April, UCSOP will be featuring our many student organizations. At UCSOP, we believe that co-curricular experiences (outside the classroom) allow our students to practice their pharmacy skills and serve our communities. 100% of our student body is a member of at least one organization and our students participate in over 25 community health fairs each year serving over 5,000 patients. 

Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International is a national organization of pharmacists that seek to honor God in our pursuit of a pharmacy career and as we serve as pharmacists. A phrase we like to share with our members is “We are Christians who are pharmacists, not pharmacists who are Christians”. By this phrase we mean that we seek God first in our daily lives and because of that we will be more efficient in our jobs serving our patients. We have organized several events to serve the community but also to serve our fellow pharmacy students.

Pictured from left: Betty Kizito, Rebekah Dunham, Jamie Huff, Eric Tong, Taylor Cox, Kelcey Duerson, Chadrick Small

Pictured from left: Betty Kizito, Rebekah Dunham, Jamie Huff, Eric Tong, Taylor Cox, Kelcey Duerson, Chadrick Small

One event was Trunk or Treat at Gateway church. We dressed up as the Flintstones and handed out candy to the children along Mr. Yuk stickers and poison control pamphlets to the parents of the children. We were able to meet, and give valuable information to many families. .

Another event including serving the children of impoverished countries by participating in Operation Christmas Child. This is an international organization that allows children who would not otherwise receive a Christmas gift to be able to open a present on Christmas and to hear the name of Christ. Operation Christmas Child collects shoeboxes filled with toys, treats, hygiene items and many other things these kids enjoy and delivers them on Christmas. Our chapter of CPFI collected donations from members of our organization, as well as the rest of the school to provide 24 shoeboxes! Through Operation Christmas Child we will soon be notified of what country our boxes were sent to, and we will better be able to pray for the children we have had the privilege of serving. Below are pictures of our pharmacy and pre-pharmacy students packing boxes to send the children.

On the right, Dr. Leah Hall along with CPFI Members and the 24 boxes we were able to pack for needy children.

On the right, Dr. Leah Hall along with CPFI Members and the 24 boxes we were able to pack for needy children.

One group of people that we have gotten to serve this semester is a group that is often forgot about by Christians; ourselves. One thing we have enjoyed the most over the semester have been the monthly meetings that we hold where we get to take just an hour out of the day to pray together and fellowship. Being a part of this organization has been a blessing to all who have been involved thus far, and we look forward to serving our patients and the community more together in the days to come.

Contributed by: Kelcey Duerson (CPFI member, class of 2019).

Celebrating Women in Pharmacy: Mary Olds Miner

Special Note: During the Month of March, we will be highlighting women in pharmacy who have contributed significantly to the profession.

MOM  Since the establishment of North America, women have fought for their civil rights as well as their rights in the workplace. With all the accomplishments of women in the past, the present is a great time to be a female pharmacist. Fortune named pharmacy the top profession “ruled by women” in 2013. According to the 2014 National Pharmacist Workforce Survey prepared by the Midwest Pharmacy Workforce Research Consortium, 83.9% of female pharmacists work in a pharmacy-related field versus only 65.2% of their male counterparts. As a female in the profession of pharmacy today, it may be easy to forget how male driven the field once was.

The Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, founded in 1821, was the first North American pharmacy school. However, the first woman did not graduate from the college until 1883. Mrs. Mary Olds Miner graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in 1890 with a pharmaceutical chemist (PhC) degree. After graduation, Mary Miner moved to Hiawatha, Kansas where she and her husband eventually owned a pharmacy. Although owning a pharmacy is a significant task and great accomplishment for a pharmacist, Miner pushed herself to achieve more. She became very involved in pharmaceutical associations. From 1892 to 1896, Mary was the Kansas Pharmaceutical Association Secretary. Mary Miner was even elected the third vice president of the American Pharmaceutical Association (APhA) in 1895. This election named Miner the first female to ever hold an officer position of APhA. After the election, Mary Miner stated:

 I am mindful of the honor you have conferred upon me. I receive it not so much for myself as a tribute you pay to women in pharmacy. For the great American Pharmaceutical to admit to its roll of officers, no matter how low a grade of office it may be, a woman, is surely a tribute to women in Pharmacy. For this I thank you.

Mrs. Mary Miner was a true attribute to women’s progression in the profession of pharmacy. The first female president of APhA, Mary Munson Runge, was not elected until almost a century later in 1979. Miner helped pave the path for female pharmacists of today and those who aspire to enter the profession in the future.

Although women have been increasingly successful in the profession, a gender or race-dominated field should deter no one. The world is changing and becoming more diverse everyday. Pharmacy requires individuals from all walks of life to better assist the community.

References:

Achievements of women in pharmacy lauded at foundation dedication. (2012, November 1). Retrieved September 17, 2015, from http://www.pharmacist.com/node/85850

DuBois, S. (2013, March 11). 5 professions ruled by women. Fortune. Retrieved from http://fortune.com/2013/03/11/5-professions-ruled-by-women/

Henderson, M. L., Worthen, D. B. (2002, March 8). American women pharmacists. Binghamton, NY: Pharmaceutical Products Press.

Women in pharmacy. (n.d.) Retrieved September 5, 2015, from http://www.aphafoundation.org/sites/default/files/ckeditor/files/WIP%20mural%20descriptions.pdf

Gaither, C. A., Schommer, J. C., Doucette, W. R., Kreling, D. H., Mott, D. A. (2015, April 8) 2014 national pharmacist workforce survey. Retrieved September 15, 2015, from http://www.aacp.org/resources/research/pharmacyworkforcecenter/ Documents/ExecutiveSummaryFromTheNationalPharmacistWorkforceStudy2014.pdf

Contributed by: Domonique Dobson, P2, Class of 2018